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The Story of
old Growth


Old Growth Forests 1620

Jorgenson, Lisa. Grand Trees of America:
Our State and Champion Trees.
Roberts Rinehart Publishers:
Niwot, Colorado 1992, p. 4

Why Old Growth?

In ancient forests, trees grow slow and straight, fighting for light and nutrients. The lumber found in America’s older buildings is harvested from these virgin forests. Exhibiting up to 30 growth rings per inch, this clear and dense wood is superior in stability, and decay resistant to today’s commercially available lumber. This clear, stable, decay resistant lumber is being replaced with softer, less durable, plantation grown material.

 


Old Growth Forests 1850

Jorgenson, Lisa. Grand Trees of America:
Our State and Champion Trees.
Roberts Rinehart Publishers:
Niwot, Colorado 1992, p. 4

What is Plantation Growth?

Since most commercially available lands have been harvested of old-growth, lumber companies now plant and harvest genetically altered trees to grow to maturity in 15 years or less. With growth rings at 3 to 5 per inch, this material tends to be less stable and more prone to decay. Plantation grown material is less effective in holding paint, and expands and contracts at a much higher rate.

 


Old Growth Forests 1990


Jorgenson, Lisa. Grand Trees of America:
Our State and Champion Trees.
Roberts Rinehart Publishers:
Niwot, Colorado 1992, p. 4


Can the Old Wood be Repaired?

Can the Old Wood be Repaired?

Most people are surprised to find that just below the surface of a seemingly unsalvageable piece of wood is quality, sound, bright wood. A simple visual inspection does not tell the entire story. An awl or a pen knife will allow one to “see” beneath the wood surface. In many cases the decay/damaged wood is only near the surface.